Google Chrome to Continue Using Browsing History for Targeted Ads

Jeeva Shanmugam
By Jeeva Shanmugam
3 Min Read

The announcement by Google Chrome that it will keep using browser history to offer targeted adverts even after phase-out of third-party cookies in 2023 has drawn criticism from privacy groups.

The organization’s latest policy, called “Enhanced Ad Privacy,” groups people into categories according to their interests using a technology called Topics. Then, websites can ask Chrome to show users adverts related to their top search subjects.

According to Google, Topics are exclusively chosen by the user on their device and are not shared with Google or any other third party. Privacy end users contend that the technology is still excessively intrusive and that it has the potential to be used to monitor people throughout the internet.

Google AD Privacy Feature
Source: Jeeva Shanmugam for TrueTech

Google has justified its choice, claiming that Enhanced Ad Privacy represents a necessary trade-off between privacy and the requirement to provide pertinent advertisements. The business claims to be developing further privacy-preserving technologies, such as Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoC), which may eventually replace Topics.

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When FLoC will be prepared for general use, though, is unknown. Google’s new targeted ad policy is expected to continue to stir up debate in the interim.

How to Stop Chrome’s Targeted Ads?

If your privacy is a concern, you can manage targeted adverts in Chrome by doing the following:

Go to Settings > Privacy and security > Ad settings in Chrome.
Select “Opt out of interest-based advertising” under “Ad personalization.”
Additionally, you have the option to remove Chrome’s browsing history and other browsing data.
You can help to safeguard your privacy and stop Google from serving tailored ads by doing the measures listed below.

Other web browsers, such as Firefox and Brave, have taken different strategies than Chrome to address targeted marketing and user privacy. To prevent third-party cookies and other tracking ways, Firefox uses a technology called Tracking Protection. On the other side, Brave uses Brave Rewards to show privacy-protecting advertisements that are supported by its users.

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For people worried about their online privacy, these alternative browsers provide more privacy-friendly features. As a result, those who are concerned about their privacy might think about switching to one of these browsers as a proactive measure to improve their online privacy and lessen the impact of targeted advertising.

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The announcement by Google Chrome that it will keep using browser history to offer targeted adverts even after phase-out of third-party cookies in 2023 has drawn criticism from privacy groups.

The organization’s latest policy, called “Enhanced Ad Privacy,” groups people into categories according to their interests using a technology called Topics. Then, websites can ask Chrome to show users adverts related to their top search subjects.

According to Google, Topics are exclusively chosen by the user on their device and are not shared with Google or any other third party. Privacy end users contend that the technology is still excessively intrusive and that it has the potential to be used to monitor people throughout the internet.

Google AD Privacy Feature
Source: Jeeva Shanmugam for TrueTech

Google has justified its choice, claiming that Enhanced Ad Privacy represents a necessary trade-off between privacy and the requirement to provide pertinent advertisements. The business claims to be developing further privacy-preserving technologies, such as Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoC), which may eventually replace Topics.

- Advertisement -

When FLoC will be prepared for general use, though, is unknown. Google’s new targeted ad policy is expected to continue to stir up debate in the interim.

How to Stop Chrome’s Targeted Ads?

If your privacy is a concern, you can manage targeted adverts in Chrome by doing the following:

Go to Settings > Privacy and security > Ad settings in Chrome.
Select “Opt out of interest-based advertising” under “Ad personalization.”
Additionally, you have the option to remove Chrome’s browsing history and other browsing data.
You can help to safeguard your privacy and stop Google from serving tailored ads by doing the measures listed below.

Other web browsers, such as Firefox and Brave, have taken different strategies than Chrome to address targeted marketing and user privacy. To prevent third-party cookies and other tracking ways, Firefox uses a technology called Tracking Protection. On the other side, Brave uses Brave Rewards to show privacy-protecting advertisements that are supported by its users.

- Advertisement -

For people worried about their online privacy, these alternative browsers provide more privacy-friendly features. As a result, those who are concerned about their privacy might think about switching to one of these browsers as a proactive measure to improve their online privacy and lessen the impact of targeted advertising.

Share This Article
Making spicy content on the Internet!
Leave a comment